Imaging-based Phenotypic Screening is a extremely powerful and flexible approach to drug discovery and pre-clinical research.

Learn how imaging-based phenotypic assays work and what kind of information you can expect from working with us.

LEARN MORE >>>

FIVE STEPS TO PHENOTYPIC DATA FROM AUTOMATED QUANTITATIVE IMAGING

Using the Hoechst channel, the nuclear boundary is defined in a process called segmentation. Segmentation uses local changes in pixel intensity to find the border region. The resulting definition of the border and object contained within is called a mask. The mask for the Hoechst channel is designated as region of interest 1 (ROI#1) in this example.

Analysis of the example protein depicted in green is based on the location of the nuclear mask using this particular analysis algorithm. ROI#1 is transposed to the green protein channel so that the signal intensity of the protein that are coincident (spatially) with the nuclear mask can be measured.

The mask generated by the Hoechst signal is also expanded in a process called dilation to form a second ROI (ROI#2, shown in red). This second ROI can be used to quantify protein in the cytoplasmic region surrounding each nucleus.

See how to detect puncta within each ROI >>>

createmasks

Top